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Customer experience first?

Customer experience first?

How to gain more time to serve your customers Successful companies are more focused on innovation, put the customer experience first and are prepared to invest in technology. These were the conclusions of a study sponsored by BluJay Solutions (Source: logistiek.nl). A significant 37% of successful companies said that offering a better customer experience was one of the most important drivers for innovation in the supply chain. In addition, the study shows that there is a clear link between business success, innovation and customer focus. So how do you make sure that your store staff have more time to provide a superior retail customer experience? Automation in the retail industry To make time-consuming processes more efficient, companies are focusing more and more on automation in the retail industry. And that is a smart move. Why perform complex processes by hand if you can do it automatically? A variety of smart software is already used to manage purchasing processes. But the first allocation and replenishment processes are much more complex. So it’s strange that these processes are often not automated. Many retail stores use Excel to do this (read the article: No future for inventory management in Excel) and store staff lose a lot of time choosing the right inventory and analyzing the data. What a waste. Because they can make far better use of this time to create a memorable retail customer experience. Innovations in inventory optimization Automation is a step in the right direction, but innovation goes much farther. A great deal of inventory software works according to one-on-one replenishment. Was one article sold? Then it’s replaced with one of the same. Sounds good on paper, but it’s not always effective in practice. Stores often do not have a desired item in stock for a customer or have too much stock of items that nobody wants (read the article: Too much stock left over?). Smart Supply is inventory optimization software that not only automates your processes, but makes them work smarter too. Dynamic replenishment based on actual customer demand. This type of inventory optimization works much more accurately. The right product, in the right color and size, in the right location. Thanks to Smart Supply your processes are automated, your staff lose less time reshuffling stock and there is more time to focus on what’s really important: the customer.

Interested in learning more about our innovation in retail automation and dynamic replenishment? Read everything about Smart Supply or contact us.

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Too much stock left over?

Too much stock left over?

Smart Supply makes that go away! Too much stock at the end of the season is not only harmful to the profit of your store or brand, it is also becoming an increasingly larger problem for the environment. If everything works right, it is no surprise if you have too much stock or not. Are there some articles that don’t sell as well during the season? That is very frustrating. These articles are put on sale, re-distributed over other stores, go to outlet centers or may even be destroyed. In all of these cases, it means two things: extra costs and lower profit margins. It also has an enormous impact on the environment. Impact on the environment Do you end up with way too much stock at the end of the season? You are not alone. The fashion industry in the Netherlands ends up with 21,5 million pieces of unsold clothing (Source: MVO Nederland). Some 13,8% of all newly manufactured clothing does not make it into the closet of the consumer, but remains at the manufacturer, wholesalers and store owners. This problem is due to poor trend forecasting or ordering too much inventory, but the root of the problem lies at a much deeper level: size, model and color. A large portion of this clothing is sold to commercial buyers or donated to charities. Over and above that, about 1,23 million pieces of clothing are destroyed a year – many in incinerators. You can imagine what negative consequences this has on the environment. Sustainable purchasing is therefore an important issue. Sustainable purchasing with Smart Supply These are disturbing numbers. Fortunately there is a solution. Today stock level is based on data from the past. In practice, this is not always the best approach. Smart Supply is a stock optimisation software that helps retailers make better decisions about their inventory. To drastically reduce stock surplus and create a healthier, more sustainable business. With Smart Supply your inventory replenishment is based on actual sales transactions. The algorithm in our software calculates the highest potential per SKU (Stock Keeping Unit) per location. This allows the software to make extremely accurate inventory recommendations based on the demand from the consumer. And this approach makes a difference.

Want to know more about sustainable purchasing? Read more about Smart Supply or get in touch with us.

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Do you have your stock in the right place?

Do you have your stock in the right place?

Are you responsible for inventory management at your store(s)? Do you frequently have to say “no” to your customers? Not only do you disappoint your customers, you also needlessly miss out on sales. That’s a shame. Because if you don’t have a pair of jeans in size 32/32 in stock at store A, but have plenty at store B, that’s a missed sales opportunity. Do you actually know if you have your stock in the right place? In this blog, we will answer that question for you. Standard allocation The distribution of stock across your stores starts with the initial allocation. Like many others, you probably use a standard allocation based on a standard size curve, for example 1-2-3-3-2-1. If you sell one black polo T-shirt, size XS, once a month, this is replaced with a new one (1 on 1 replenishment). But what if you sell the same polo, size XS, once a week? Could you have sold 2 T-shirts per week? In other words, do you have sufficient insight to replace your stock level according to item, color, size and store level? External factors The example described above shows that replacing stock based on a standard size curve does not always work effectively. And we have not even talked about unexpected, external factors. The summer weather extends a few weeks into September and all the winter jackets are already hanging in the store, but sales are lagging behind. If the weather suddenly turns cold at the end of September and the sales skyrocket, can you react quickly enough to demand with 1 on 1 replenishment? It will probably take you too long to bring stock up to the right level and you will have to say no when there is a demand for several different sizes. Dynamic inventory management with Smart Supply To be sure that you have your stock in the right place, you need a more dynamic form of inventory management. No standard 1 on 1 replenishment, but re-stocking decisions based on demand. Smart Supply is a stock optimisation software that determines your inventory replenishment based on actual sales transactions. Stock is not generally distributed evenly over all stores. Our algorithm calculates which product, in which size and color should be sent to which store. Where is the potential per item the highest? Based on that information, stock is sent from the distribution center to the right location. This allows you to quickly react to an increase in demand at one of your stores.

Would you like to learn more about the opportunities available with dynamic inventory management? Discover the possibilities with Smart Supply. Request a demo of get in touch with us.

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Out of Stock

Out of Stock

Research on how customers respond to stock outs Higher inventories, improve forecast accuracy, increase shipment frequency; all attempts to ensure sell out on store level. Zero stock on an active article means high chance on lost sales and the lost sales are even higher in case the article is a fast mover. Out of stock Point of sale data analysis shows that out of stock % in the store for fashion related articles like apparel and shoes has the highest rate in retail: it varies from 30 to 40%. This compared to the 8 to 9 % in FMCG. For fashion this means that for each article 2 or even 3 sizes are not present at the point of purchase. Consequences on the short term are loss of revenue and on the long term erosion of brand equity, loyalty and potentially market share. Equally alarming is that out of stocks (OOS) have not improved significantly over the years, even though significant investments have been made in people, process and technology by both retailers and their supplying partners. Root causes of stocks According to another comprehensive study 47% of out of stock positions show a strong dependency on forecasting and replenishment policies between merchandise department and store. A striking 25% of out of stocks are caused by the lack of continuous in store replenishment. It turns out that even if the article is present at the store location, the article is not visible for the customer on the designated space on the shelf. The other 28% of the root causes can be found upstream in the supply chain.


Figure 1.Root causes of out of stocks, credit Gruen,Corsten and Bharadwaj

The figure shows that the fulfilment processes, in spite of the high technology budgets and countless man hours invested, have been hampered by limited visibility into timely point of sale level data and a lack of holistic applications required triggering ‘read and react' actions from that data. All required to help improve store execution and point of sale SKU (Stock Keeping Unit or article size) level replenishment. Customer response to out of stocks It is becoming clear to everyone in the business that direct sales loss is only one part of the outflow OOS items produce. In a benchmark based on 72.000 shoppers, shown in Figure 2, it is made clear how poor on-shelf availability impacts sales and brand. The impact to suppliers is on average 31% of intended sales, and the impact to retailers is 43% of intended sales. The total costs can be divided in strategic and operational costs effecting both suppliers and retailers. Retailer impact - Operational costs are increased through personnel looking for OOS items in back room, providing "rain checks" to shoppers, unplanned restocking, etc.; - OOS distorts true store demand, thus decreases forecasting and ordering accuracy. Strategic impact - Direct loss of store loyalty; - Decreased customer satisfaction; - OOS encourages shopping at competitor stores. Supplier impact - OOS lowers the potential impact of promotions; - OOS distorts true store demand, thus category management and related efforts are less accurate and effective; - OOS increases overall costs of the relationship with the retailer due to increased post- audit activity and irregular ordering. Strategic impact - Direct loss of brand loyalty and brand equity; - OOS encourages trial of competitor brands; - Lowered overall effectiveness of sales team resource. Margin improvement for the fashion industry Reducing stock outs will bring an ever increasing value for the retailer and its supplier. An integrated approach to improve store fulfilment processes will synchronize supply coming in with actual store demand. With current complex operating procedures it seems that we have lost connection with the end consumer. The consumer is the one that is spending money, all operational procedures should subordinate. The graphs prove that operational excellence not yet coincides with customer excellence.

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Taking the right measure

Taking the right measure

How the size curve in fashion is related to your product margin When people are looking for the latest trend in fashion, one specific item can catch the eye easily: "I like this one, I would like to try this on". Now the moment of truth arises; "Will this nice shirt also be available in my size?" Unfortunately for both shopper and retailer it happens quite often that the desired item is not available at the point of purchase.
Why has this become so common in fashion? Fashion The fashion industry is a rather complex business environment with a wide range of products and an extreme short product life cycle. A fashion store with less than 5.000 unique product codes is nowadays hard to find, while the collection can change up to 12 times per year. Apparel products have become just as perishable as groceries. All decisions regarding the numbers have to be taken one year before the product actually hits the shop floor. The quantities of the initial buy are based on demand forecasts along with buyer intuition, well framed within the financial budget. This is especially true for fast fashionable items. For basic collections (never out of stock) other rules may apply. Initial store lode in When the new collection arrives in the warehouse it is distributed to the stores. The initial buying decision was crucial, because buying more during the season is rarely an option. After the first load in, a certain percentage of the quantity bought is left behind in the warehouse for in season replenishment. Depending on the allocation strategy this percentage varies from 0% to 40%. The allocation decision is also very important because the challenge is not to ship too much, but definitely not too little. The goal is to secure the sell out while minimizing the costs. High transportation and handling costs have to be prevented; minimal inter store transfer adds up to a good product margin. The quantities of the store load in are determined by the size curve (range of different sizes) and number of items per size (depth). A size curve is designed to ensure the right quantity in the store from a visual merchandise point of view. Figure 1: Example size curve initial store load in: 15 pieces Size curve for visual merchandise From a store perspective putting the right quantity on display is very important to entice clients. In order to present the collection, the store layout is connected with the size curve to determine the quantities to put on the shop floor. The number of pieces per size will be used as the replenishment target to ensure the proper display throughout the product life cycle. One sold, one replenished. At first sight this process seems to be efficient but is this really the case? Size curve to trigger replenishment In retail the difference between profit and loss is in the little details; a few pieces of apparel shipped to the wrong location will already have a huge impact on the product margin. Especially during the season start when the items are sold at full price. One piece sold will trigger one replenishment order; everything is done to keep the size curve intact as long as possible in the product life cycle. Is this the right logic? E.g., if one size is sold only after two months, replenishment is not logic at all. Another store with a sell-out of two per week on the same size would be a better choice. In another scenario just a few sizes are not moving, while other sizes sell better than expected. The initial size curve does not reflect the actual sell out and sticking to the rule of keeping the size curve intact will have another negative effect on the product margin. The huge impact really shows at the end of season when the excess inventory has to be marked down while in another location sales are lost on the same items. Figure 2: Example size curve after 3 weeks sell out: 15 pieces

Preventing mark down is impossible, but to replenish the wrong size to keep the initial size curve intact will put unnecessary pressure on the product margin. Automated replenishment The size curve is the right tool to link with the store layout and to determine the first load into the stores. The initial size curve as instrument to replenish in season is devastating for the product margin. It is unbelievable that the vast majority of fashion brands still allows their system to automatically replenish the shop floor with the initial size curve as the inventory target. Visual merchandise decision making should be strictly segregated from in season replenishment targets. Does it make any difference for the visual display that the number of pieces per size differs from shop to shop, while the total number of pieces is the same? Only the shopper will notice: "Yes! My size is available, I'm going to try it on". Collection profitability If the shoppers are enticed by the collection, then it's up to availability to cash the success. Higher availability on colour size level will increase the product margin and leverage the creativity. Understanding the role of the size curve is a big step into the right direction. A good collection will become even better when it is sold at the highest possible margin.

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Is the Lingerie Market on the Verge of Another Disruption?

Is the Lingerie Market on the Verge of Another Disruption?

ChainBalance Smart Supply software will help you to manage the inventory of one of the most technical products in fashion: lingerie! As we already serve a lingerie customer with our software, we are happy to say that we know what we are talking about. Why is lingerie so technical? - very few manufacturers in the world - very high minimums order - Size curve specifics Read all about the complexity and challenges of lingerie in the complete article on  Business of Fashion

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Voorraadbeheer – Complex maar absoluut onmisbaar

Voorraadbeheer – Complex maar absoluut onmisbaar

"Voorraadbeheer maakt onlosmakelijk onderdeel uit van het optimaliseren van de hele logistieke keten. Het is van grote invloed op het aspect klanttevredenheid én kosten. Met het groeiende belang neemt ook de complexiteit van het vakgebied toe. Voor het verlagen van voorraad, het terugdringen van onverkoopbare voorraad of het verbeteren van de voorraadaansturing kan een investering in optimalisatiesoftware gewenst zijn."  Bron Logistiek.nl ChainBalance heeft een unieke softwareoplossing (SaaS) voor u ontwikkeld! ChainBalance Smart Supply software maakt geautomatiseerde verkoopbevorderende voorraad suggesties ter verbetering van uw proces van voorraadbeslissingen. Het volledige artikel vindt u hier.

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RFID in retail: are you making the most of them?

RFID in retail: are you making the most of them?

More and more retailers are discovering the advantages of Radio Frequency Identification RFID retail solutions. RFID tags in retail clothing items give you real-time insights into stock levels and you can instantly share this information with the warehouse. This increases the accuracy of your inventory counts compared to doing it by hand. Using RFID in retail supply chain processes also makes omnichannel replenishment much easier to manage. In short: logistical processes become much more efficient and less error prone. But how do you make the most of this improved accuracy? Higher profits through higher stock reliability RFID tags in retail clothing improves inventory counts, but making sure the right stock is replenished is another issue altogether. Because even if your inventory counts are as accurate as possible, if your stock is lying in the wrong spot, you can’t make any money off it. Many retailers use standard size curves and 1 to 1 replenishment. If a certain item in size S is sold, the same article is replenished. But are you achieving your full sales potential by doing this? What if you sent not 1 but 2 items in size S to this store? You might sell both of them! Read more in our blog ‘Do you have your stock in the right place?’ . Achieve your full sales potential with dynamic replenishment Smart Supply is stock optimisation software that offers dynamic replenishment. After the first allocation, the software uses an algorithm to determine the highest sales potential per SKU (Stock Keeping Unit) for each sales location. Items are sent to the stores where the demand for them is the highest at that moment. Our market approach is based on the principle that ‘the consumer is the heartbeat of the supply chain’. Stock is replenished based on the actual demand from the consumer. Redistributing stock, saying ‘no’ to customers and excess inventory are a thing of the past. Imagine what this could mean for your turnover and operational costs! Smart Supply helps you get the most out of RFID in retail supply chain processes. Interested in RFID retail solutions, Smart Supply or a combination of both that can produce better results? Get in touch with us to find out more

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Isn't it obvious

Isn't it obvious

by Eliyahu M. Goldratt Abstract of a management book This article is based on Eliyahu Goldratt's book Isn't It Obvious. Together with Ilan Eshkoli and Joe Brownleer, Goldratt explains how his Theory of Constraints (TOC) can be implemented in a retail supply chain. The goal of this article is to reveal the essence of a responsive supply chain. As it is impossible to forecast sales at store article size level per day of the week, a responsive supply chain will deliver high value to fashion supply chains. The services of ChainBalance are developed with the responsive supply chain in mind. Like in the book, the essence will be explained step by step; the changes that will have to take place at store-level, regional warehouse-level, central warehouse-level and at supplier-level. Enjoy reading this article. Ben Vermin, Managing Director ChainBalance BV Store-level In the story, a shop manager is forced to move the stock of his storeroom to the regional warehouse. He is not very happy about it, he is convinced to lose grip on his stock. Surprisingly enough, it turns out to be a smart move; financial records soon show that his store improves dramatically. Suddenly the shop has the highest sales of the region and within a couple of months even of the whole chain. Because the stock moves from the store to the regional warehouse, the replenishment process has to change. Replenishment has to switch to an ‘order daily and deliver frequent' schedule. Per SKU (stock keeping unit), there will be an amount that is equal to twenty times the average daily sales. The store has to verify per day what is sold. To enable this, the store implements a method that uses three color-codes to indicate how the SKUs are doing. A SKU will get the priority red when the inventory turns are higher than expected. If it remains red for a week, there will be an alert to raise the target. When a SKU is green, it means that the inventory turns are too low. If a SKU is green for over two weeks, the store will have to reduce the target inventory. The zone between red and green is yellow. Yellow means the replenishment process is under control. The SKU has got the right amount of inventory to satisfy actual demand in the store. Regional warehouse-level Not only store operations will have to make some changes, the regional warehouse also has to adjust. Until recently, whole cartons of one product were transported, but if they would continue to work this way, the shop manager will have the entire inventory back in his store in no time. Therefore, the regional warehouse will only ship what the shop needs. The regional warehouse will have to start order-picking per piece. The regional warehouse will change from a wholesale business to a retail warehouse. In chapter 18 of Isn't It Obvious is clearly shown the difference between the way the shop described above operated at first, and how it will operate with the method the shop discovered by accident. In graph 1 is shown the situation as it was before. The starting point of each vertical line (left) indicates the starting inventory in the store. As the store sells, the inventory gradually goes down. Once it reaches the predetermined level of minimum inventory, the system generates an order for replenishment. It takes time before the goods arrive, but when they do, the inventory jumps back and the cycle will repeat itself. Unfortunately, in practice it is very different. In graph 1 the new shipment always arrives before the store runs out of inventory, though in reality this is frequently not the case. The shipment often arrives too late from the supplier. That means that the graph can be at zero for long periods of time (graph 2).Insight into the true damage of out of stock starts in the store. Other entities in the supply chain have proof that they are not the weakest link. Integrity of out of stock data on retail level is still very hard to find. More focus on this KPI will clearly close the gap between current statistics and our intuition as a shopper. Availability is the decisive factor to turn a shopper into a consumer. Whether out of stock is a showstopper for the consumer in 9% or 59% of its planned purchases will differ from store to store. The investment to improve the store replenishment process could very well be paid back before the next collection hits the shop floor. With the new system, the shipment only has to come from the regional warehouse. This decreases the supply time to no more than a few days; in most cases just one day. Moreover, the shop immediately informs the regional warehouse when something has been sold. The graph will look something like graph 3. The graphs prove that stores can sell more with less stock. There will be higher inventory turns and articles are less often out of stock. Furthermore, less capital employed will be needed. As more is sold against lower costs the profit will increase and since the inventory turns also increase, the return on the investment raises too. Central warehouse Since the new way of operating is such a success, they will try to implement this method on several other stores with the same regional warehouse. Because of this, the regional warehouse has to be organized completely different. Every shop's stock will be aggregated in the regional warehouse. The shops do not have their own stock in their storeroom anymore, but there is only one inventory for all the shops within the regional warehouse. Now no cross-shipments will be needed between the shops within the region of the regional warehouse. It will not be the case anymore that one shop has too little inventory of a product while another suffers from excessive stock on the same SKU. There will be replenishment based on the actual needs of a shop. The regional warehouse will transform into a retail warehouse. The process of receiving goods from the vendor and shipping boxes out now moves to a higher level in the chain. A central warehouse is created. The central warehouse performs an important function in the chain; it keeps inventory of all SKUs that will be sold in more than one region and the inventory that is slow moving on regional level. In a previous stage, no cross-shipments were needed between shops within the same region of the warehouse; with a central warehouse there are even no cross-shipments needed between the regional warehouses. The orders of the shops and the regional warehouses are not based on weekly orders anymore, but will directly be triggered by the daily sales in the shops. Additional notes The book 'Isn't It Obvious' could have been clearer about the impact on the transportation costs. One could expect that the transportation costs will increase significantly. This is not the case: The content of the truck load / container changes; instead of filling the trucks with pallets of a limited number of different products, they are now filled with cartons of several different products; Daily order creation and frequent replenishment runs will have a stabilizing impact on the spikes in the supply chain meaning less rush orders. Capacity planning will become more efficient thanks to the automated flow of orders; The store to store shipments will decrease considerably, which will save costs. It certainly is possible that the extra costs for frequent order picking will be covered by the reduction of cross shipments alone.

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How to steer on your stock availability in the stores?

How to steer on your stock availability in the stores?

Due to the pandemic you are likely facing challenges related to stock shortages in your current collection. Less stock has been purchased and stock is delivered with a delay. How do you make sure you have the right stock in the right stores to generate the most revenue? Making sure the stock is in those stores where it will be sold the best is key at this moment. Dynamic inventory management with Smart Supply To be sure that you have your stock in the right place, you need a more dynamic form of inventory management. Not standard 1 on 1 replenishment, but re-stocking decisions based on current demand. The Smart Supply stock optimisation software determines your inventory replenishment based on actual sales transactions. Stock is generally not distributed evenly across all stores. Our algorithm calculates which product, in which size and color should be sent to which store. Where is the potential per item the highest? Based on that information, stock is sent from the distribution center to the right location. This allows you to quickly react to an increase in demand at one of your stores. Would you like to learn more about the benefits of dynamic inventory management for your business? Discover the possibilities with Smart Supply. Request a demo or get in touch with us.

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Make consumer behaviour the heartbeat of the supply chain

Make consumer behaviour the heartbeat of the supply chain

Dynamic replenishment Every brand and retailer wants to create, produce, and sell products that make their consumers happy. Various product factors influence this, like design, colour, fabric, quality, and fit. But the supply chain is also a key factor to ensure happy customers. Many details matter in bringing products from factory to consumer. To do this right, it’s smart to make consumer behaviour the heartbeat of the supply chain. Availability Availability is vital, but how to achieve the highest availability with the stock you have purchased? What to do with all different sizes and colours, should they be available in all stores? How can I make sure the colours and sizes fit with the customer profiles in each specific store? A lot of valid questions, and there is no generic, averaged, 'one size fits all' approach to all these influencing factors. The solution lies within flexibility. When you keep the stock within your supply chain as flexible as possible, you can agilely respond and adapt to consumer behaviour. With flexibility, we mean enough stock in your stores, but not too much, and plenty of stock in your central warehouse to flexibly fulfill each store's individual needs. With dynamic target levels adjusted to the consumer’s purchasing behaviour, you ensure the highest availability for the right products in the stores. And not just at an aggregated product level, but at SKU (stock keeping unit) level, including size, colour, or other variables. And not just across stores, but detailed for every specific store and dynamically adjusted within the season. A smart algorithm correctly changes the target levels corresponding to the product's life cycle and incorporates exceptional sales peaks, events, and end of season sales periods. Inventory turns The turns of your inventory reflect the fit of your products with the consumer's needs. Within fashion retail and other slow mover consumer products, this is an important measurement to steer on. By adjusting the target levels dynamically to consumer behaviour, the inventory turns will increase. There will be more shelf-space for best-selling products by lowering the target levels for the real slow movers. That way, stores unlock the hidden sales potential of their articles. By doing this, we saw examples where stores sold three times more of a product in a specific colour and size. For one specific SKU, the target level increased from 3 to 12 and all pieces were sold at their original price! Inventory movements Transportation involves time and money. Therefore, you need to avoid unnecessary movements. Above we already mentioned that flexibility within your supply chain is key to the right availability. The same goes for inventory movement. When keeping your stock flexible and as high as possible within your supply chain, you avoid unnecessary movements like redistribution to other stores and warehouses. All the above highlights the main factors of making consumer behaviour the heartbeat of your supply chain. This heartbeat is critical to outperform your peers within the ever-evolving retail landscape. Feel free to contact us and get in touch when you would like to learn more on this topic.

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No future for inventory management in Excel

No future for inventory management in Excel

Two thirds of companies consider Excel a supply chain management system. That was one finding from a survey commissioned by BluJay Solutions. It seems to work fine for small stores with a limited number of SKU’s (Stock Keeping Units). But it is much more complicated for large brands or stores with a number of branches and complex size chart. Companies also see more opportunities through automation and innovation. So is Excel fit for modern times? We give you three reasons why we think replenishment in Excel has no future. Reliability of inventory management in Excel Excel is excellent software for storing and managing data. Are you using this software as a supply chain management system? Then you must ask yourself how reliable it is. Data is manually entered, often by several people: buyers, logistic managers and supply chain managers. Hundreds of columns and rows of information make this system naturally prone to errors and therefore very vulnerable. Complexity of optimizing inventory In order to grow as a company it’s important to optimize inventory within your supply chain management. And in order to optimize, you need to extensively analyze data. That gives you insight into the relationships between data and helps you uncover new opportunities. Maybe you have enough women’s sweaters in your store inventory. But what happens when one specific item becomes a popular seller – and there’s almost no more in stock? Can you quickly see this in your Excel sheet? You also have to be able to anticipate changes in the market. Excel is very limited if you want to do complex data analysis. Your personnel have to spend a lot of valuable time to do this. Focus on automated and innovation in supply chain management Automation is a good solution for the problems described above. Smart software eliminates the error sensitivity of work carried out by different people and is designed to carry out complex analyses much faster and more accurately. In addition, automation and innovation are currently ‘hot topics’ in supply chain management. Retail organizations are always looking for ways to reduce costs and stay ahead of their competition. At the same time, good customer service is becoming an ever more important pillar for many companies. With smart inventory optimization software you free up more time for your customers. Interested in what inventory optimization software can do for your company? Request a demo or get in touch with us!

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